ZEISS EMBL3D Talk: Correlative Microscopy-Spectroscopy Studies, by Silke Christiansen

May 23, 2016
The innovation potential of correlative microscopy / spectroscopy will be demonstrated for fundamental biomedical bone and tissue research. At the beginning of the ‘food chain’, laboratory scale x-ray microscopy (XRM) will be used to obtain large volume overviews at smallest, lab scale voxel sizes (~700nm3) for a precise localization of areas of interest. XRM tomography and correlative workflows in microscopy and spectroscopy will enable in depth structural, compositional, and optical analyses but such approaches have still huge developmental needs. These include: (i) handling (evaluation, storage, correlation / overlay, deployment to users) of vast amounts of data, (ii) exploration of specifically designed sample preparation protocols especially when the workflow foresees correlation of XRM with dual beam focused ion and electron beam microscopies (FIB/SEM), Raman spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) techniques and so on, (iii) exploration of sample pipelines through various microscopy / spectroscopy machines determining a variety of material properties at various length scales from several mm down to sub nm resolution, (iv) exploitation of in situ mechanical testing of bone materials (correlative analytics at different lengths scales in XRM, FIB SEM, Raman, SIMS) leading to unprecedented correlated data sets. http://www.selectscience.net/embl-3d-microscopy | http://www.zeiss.com/microscopy
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