Innovating Energy Storage Materials using Correlative Microscopy by ZEISS

June 17, 2016 ZEISS Microscopy

Professor Silke Christiansen, Freie Universität Berlin, and Helmholtz Center for Materials and Energy, talks about a new era of microscopy

Correlative Microscopy by ZEISS: Bridging the micro and nano worlds.
Correlative Microscopy by ZEISS: Bridging the micro and nano worlds.

By training a materials scientist, Professor Silke Christiansen, Freie Universität Berlin, leads an institute at the Helmholtz Center for Materials and Energy where her team studies everything “from semiconductors to other materials with specific electrical and optical properties”. The uniting factor is that “everything is at the nanoscale”. Professor Christiansen recently presented at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory conference ‘From 3D Light to 3D Electron Microscopy’, organized in conjunction with ZEISS Microscopy, where we had the chance to speak with her about the advantages that correlative solutions by ZEISS bring for her bleeding-edge research into nanomaterials.

At the Helmholtz Center, her team is working on “new sorts of solar cells and fuel devices”, she explained, developing complex nanomaterials to “convert solar energy into other forms of energy, such as heat or chemical energy”. “There are many, many challenges, the biggest of which is storage”, she revealed. There has been a huge rise in the production and use of renewable energy but “all these new forms of renewable energy have to be stored to be used throughout times when they cannot be produced”.

All nanoshapes and sizes

“Very often, we use nano wires, because they have a huge aspect ratio – a small diameter and a long length – so they have a large surface that can be functionalized”, Prof. Christiansen explained. Her team uses “all sorts of molecules” to tune the surfaces of the nanowires, “such as those that terminate the surface, additional layers that can absorb solar light and materials that can guide electrons to electrodes”. For solar storage, materials need to “be a semiconductor and need to have the right bandgap to absorb the solar energy, which is most efficient in the green part of the spectrum”, said Prof. Christiansen, so “semiconductors like silicon of different shapes and sizes, or III/V materials such as gallium nitride or gallium arsenide” are used.

The power of microscopy

Professor Silke Christiansen, Helmholtz Center Berlin
Professor Silke Christiansen, Helmholtz Center Berlin

Working with nanoscale, microscopy is crucial to visualize “what materials we have, and where the objects are”. For a solar cell, different properties need to be optimized, “so we need correlative microscopy, where what we see is correlated to optical and electrical measurements”. From artificial and natural materials to medical and biological samples, “we need correlative microscopy to optimize and advance understanding of future materials”. This ongoing and cutting edge research has been made possible through “very unique equipment from ZEISS”, Prof Christiansen revealed, such as top-of-the-line focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopes or the unique ORION helium-ion microscope (HIM).

Multi-modal interdisciplinary research

Correlative microscopy “brings many techniques together”, and ZEISS have developed a “smarter” door system where “different doors with different functionalities” can be used, or removed. Therefore, she explained, “instead of having multiple techniques crammed together, you can use only the technique you want to use for that sample”. “We have come to a new era of electron microscopy”, explained Prof Christiansen. “We can ask and answer questions we could never answer before”. The technique is being applied to real world samples, such as bone and tissue in a collaboration with the medical department of Prof. Dr. Georg Schett at the University of Erlangen, looking at bone structure in osteoporosis. However, the possibilities are endless: “today, we don’t even know what there may be available in the future”.

Watch the full interview with Professor Christiansen here!

ZEISS Solutions for Materials Science

Watch interviews and presentations from the #EMBL3D conference on correlative 3D light and electron microscopy

 

ZEISS EMBL3D Talk: Correlative Microscopy-Spectroscopy Studies, by Silke Christiansen

Can’t see the embedded video? Click here!

 

About the Institute of Nanoarchitectures for Energy Conversion, Helmholtz Center Berlin

In collaboration with the Group Photonic Nanostructures at the MPI for the Science of Light, Erlangen, Germany, the Institute of Nanoarchitectures for Energy Conversion participates at the Helmholtz Research Program ‘Renewable Energies’ within the topics Solar cells of the next generation and Solar Fuels. Particularly, the research work concentrates on increasing the power-conversion efficiency of solar cell designs, enabling short- and long-term energy storage with minimal losses and maximum flexibility, and increasing the energy efficiency of light sources. Furthermore, the Institute of Nanoarchitectures for Energy Conversion participates at the Helmholtz Research Program ‘Energy efficiency, materials, and resources’ in the subtopic Methods and Concepts for Material Development. The focus is put on investigations of structure-function relationships in material systems for energy conversion by means of electron microscopy as well as by further analytical techniques and simulation methods. The electron microscopy work has been dedicated to correlative analysis of microstructural, compositional, and optoelectronic properties at the nanoscale in materials for solar-energy conversion, relating these properties to corresponding device performances. Experimental facilities are established to carry out analytical and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) including nanomanipulation.

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